March 2024 Willamette Valley MLS Stats

Baby Boomers’ Wave to Downsize

As the first groups of baby boomers gracefully rides the wave of aging, they are setting new trends in the housing market, giving birth to what experts fondly refer to as the “Silver Tsunami.” This phenomenon is not merely about a change in address; it’s a lifestyle transformation tailored to meet the unique needs of the golden years.

With approximately 10,000 people reaching the age of 65 every day, the United States is witnessing an unprecedented demographic shift. By 2030, all baby boomers will have passed this milestone. Among these remarkable statistics, the AARP’s estimate stands out: a staggering 74% of total U.S. homeownership belongs to individuals over 50, with more than half of this demographic opting for downsizing their home as a strategic move.

The Silver Tsunami is, in essence, a testament to the demographic strength of the baby boomer generation. Born between 1946 and 1964, this generation has played a pivotal role in shaping American society at every stage of life. Now, as they embrace their senior years, they are reshaping the real estate landscape. Downsizing has become a prevailing trend among this generation.

One of the fundamental aspects of this is the desire for aging Americans to remain in their homes, a concept known as “aging in place.” However, this doesn’t necessarily mean staying in the same large family home that has seen decades of memories. Instead, it often involves downsizing to a more manageable, efficient, and accessible living space.

The statistics are a testament to the appeal of downsizing among this generation. AARP estimates that a whopping 74% of homeownership in the United States is held by individuals over the age of 50. Additionally, more than 51% of people in this age group have already made the move to downsize.

The reasons behind this paradigm shift are as diverse as the individuals making it happen. For some, it’s about financial prudence … reducing the costs and maintenance associated with larger homes. For others, it’s the desire for a simpler, more manageable lifestyle that allows them to focus on experiences rather than possessions. Accessibility and health concerns also play a significant role, with many opting for homes that are designed to accommodate mobility challenges.

Downsizing is having a profound impact on the housing market. It’s not just about the scaling down trend; it’s also about the types of homes that are in high demand. Single-story residences, condos, and communities with amenities tailored to an active older population are experiencing increased interest. Builders and real estate developers are adapting to these evolving preferences, creating more accessible, age-friendly housing options.

It is not merely a demographic shift; it’s a testament to the baby boomer generation’s determination to embrace their golden years on their terms. Downsizing is just one facet of this multifaceted trend, and it’s changing the way we think about aging and housing. As the silver wave continues to ripple through the real estate market, it’s essential for homeowners and industry professionals alike to be aware of these evolving preferences.

One way to find out about your options is to determine the value of your current home and its equity to facilitate the change in housing.  Feel free to contact me to provide this service at no obligation as well as to inform you what is available to meet your wants and needs.

Seller Concession Cheat Sheet

Keep more profits from home sales

In recent years, home values have soared, presenting an opportunity for homeowners with substantial equity to consider a unique tax benefit.

Section 121 in the IRS code allows for homeowners who meet certain requirements to exclude up to $500,000 of capital gain on the sale of their principal residence.  Single or married taxpayers filing separately can exclude up to $250,0000 of capital gain.  Taxpayers must meet the following requirements:

  • They must have owned and used the home as a principal residence during at least 2 out of the last 5 years.
  • They should not have excluded gain from another home during the two years before the current sale.
  • The property should not have been acquired through a 1031 exchange during the past five years.

Capital gain is determined as selling price, less sales costs, less basis in the property which is the purchase price paid for the home plus capital improvements made during the tenure.  Capital gains more than the exclusion amounts are taxed at the capital gains rate which varies between 0% and 20% depending on the taxpayers adjusted gross income in the year of the sale. 

Some exceptions for divorce, death of a spouse, or military service may apply.  For more information, see IRS Publication 523 and download our Homeowners Tax Guide.  It is always advisable to seek the counsel of your tax professional for your particular situation.

Adapting to Life’s New Chapters

All of us encounter major life events and they have the possibility of disrupting our lives temporarily, if not permanently.  The homes we live in may have met our needs originally but due to a change in our life, it may no longer be adequate or the best fit for us, which will require a move. The decision to change one’s living situation often comes as a response to these pivotal moments, and the reasons behind such changes can be as diverse as the events themselves. 

The number of things that can influence these changes is numerous.  It may be the birth of a new child, or the ages of the children are getting such that you simply need more room. 

Marriages generally merge two households into one.  The possibilities are endless, but it could be two single people or two single parents each with children who need the right space to blend the families.

A promotion, transfer, or a new job could require a change in housing, or maybe just make it more convenient to move closer to where a person is working. 

Countless numbers of people have moved as a result of health issues.  It could be to get away from the altitude, or to a drier climate, or to a more rural area where life is simpler.  The death of a spouse can be the impetus for the move.

Empty nesters and retirees have the freedom to make changes to their housing that will better adapt to their new lifestyle.  The time may have come to seek a cozier, more manageable abode that suits the evolving needs of empty nesters.  It may or may not lead them to a new city or state, but it can certainly include a different size or style home than they have currently.

These are just a few examples of how major life events can set the stage for changes in housing. If you are considering a move for one of these reasons now, you will probably think about it at some point.  I can help you through today’s market, talk about timing, and guide you through the decision-making process.

I want to be your trusted agent, ready to support you finding your dream home as you start this new chapter in your life. Take the first step, when the time is right, by connecting with me.

Smart Home Tech: Is It Real Property or Personal Belongings in a Home Sale?

Many of today’s homeowners have accumulated multiple high-tech “smart” devices to make their home more convenient, economical, and fun to operate.  When they decide to sell the home, they need to make the listing agent completely aware of whether they will be included in the sale of the home. 

Some of these things easily meet the definition of real property because they are permanently installed like thermostats, doorbells, cameras, garage door openers, and pool equipment monitors.  A rule of thumb mentioned frequently is that if it were removed, the functionality would cease or if there would be evidence of where it had been, it is probably real property and is included in the sale.

Other devices like virtual assistants made by Amazon, Apple, or Google, may not specifically meet that criteria but they are needed to operate things like electrical switches and plugs, or lamps.  It becomes a grey area of whether it is real property when TV’s, doorbells, garage door openers, and other devices are dependent on the virtual assistants.

Door locks, as well as some other devices, have a master code written on them that allows the new owner to reset the combination ensuring not only their safety but potential liability for the seller.  In some cases, the seller will need to do this using the app on their computer or phone while it is still connected to their home network.  It may be prudent to arrange a time for the seller to reset the devices in question for the buyers’ convenience and security.

Smart home additions could easily be a selling point for potential buyers and sellers need to weigh the benefits of promoting the advantages of such and including those items in the sale of the home.

Make an inventory of what devices stay with the home and what needs to be done to reset them for the new owner.  This could be done at the time of listing the home and given to the listing agent at the same time the listing agreement is signed. Your listing agent will know how to handle it, but decisions must be made before the home is put on the market or it is shown to any prospective purchasers.

Renting does not increase your wealth position like homeownership

Renting

Smart Home Tech: Is It Real Property or Personal Belongings in a Home Sale?

Many of today’s homeowners have accumulated multiple high-tech “smart” devices to make their home more convenient, economical, and fun to operate.  When they decide to sell the home, they need to make the listing agent completely aware of whether they will be included in the sale of the home. 

Some of these things easily meet the definition of real property because they are permanently installed like thermostats, doorbells, cameras, garage door openers, and pool equipment monitors.  A rule of thumb mentioned frequently is that if it were removed, the functionality would cease or if there would be evidence of where it had been, it is probably real property and is included in the sale.

Other devices like virtual assistants made by Amazon, Apple, or Google, may not specifically meet that criteria but they are needed to operate things like electrical switches and plugs, or lamps.  It becomes a grey area of whether it is real property when TV’s, doorbells, garage door openers, and other devices are dependent on the virtual assistants.

Door locks, as well as some other devices, have a master code written on them that allows the new owner to reset the combination ensuring not only their safety but potential liability for the seller.  In some cases, the seller will need to do this using the app on their computer or phone while it is still connected to their home network.  It may be prudent to arrange a time for the seller to reset the devices in question for the buyers’ convenience and security.

Smart home additions could easily be a selling point for potential buyers and sellers need to weigh the benefits of promoting the advantages of such and including those items in the sale of the home.

Make an inventory of what devices stay with the home and what needs to be done to reset them for the new owner.  This could be done at the time of listing the home and given to the listing agent at the same time the listing agreement is signed. Your listing agent will know how to handle it, but decisions must be made before the home is put on the market or it is shown to any prospective purchasers.

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